AMBASSADORS

Photo Credit: Randy Lincks

RAVEN AMBASSADORS

Kye Petersen

Comfortable in any terrain, 31 year old Kye particularly loves the big mountain side of skiing. He’s traveled all over the world, heading on foot deep into remote terrain to carve unique big-mountain lines and launch cliffs. Kye has taken firsts at the 2009 and 2016 Redbull Coldrush and 2012 FWT Revelstoke, was named Skier of the Year by Freeskier magazine in 2017 and has appeared in 17 ski films – his most recent, the award winning self produced Numinous.

 

Recently, Kye chose to break free from the norm and take a new approach to branding ski shapes in collaboration with big mountain skier and first descending pioneer, Johnny ‘Foon’ Chilton – KYE Shapes. Their mission is to: ‘Build the best product, implement new designs, shapes and materials to the ski building industry in an effort to lessen our impact on the planet and improve the quality of ride on snow.’

Wayne Flann

“If you are a frequent skier, rider, heli-dropper or sledder who frequents any part of the Sea to Sky backcountry, this is the man you should be listening too when it comes to your safety.

 

Wayne Flann knows a thing or two about avalanche safety. The 33-year veteran of the Whistler Blackcomb Ski Patrol is a Professional member of the Canadian Avalanche Association, a Level 2 Canadian Ski Guides Association member, Whistler Search & Rescue, Licensed Paramedic, Long Line Rescue Technician since 1986 and Safety consultant for the film industry for the past 28 years.

 

Because he cares about the safety of people who venture out into the winter wilderness, Flann started his own blog in the fall of 2011, and has been hard at work since. He posts almost daily in the winter on avalanche activity throughout the Sea to Sky and other regions of the world. “I started the blog to get out snow pack information that I felt was pertinent for the early season conditions,” says Flann. “Had lots of positive feed back so I tried to also instill some knowledge and keep readers abreast to any trends or interesting news in the avalanche world.” – Quote from Mountain Life Magazine

Mitch Sulkers

Spend a day in the backcountry with Mitchell Sulkers and you’ll learn more than just the snow conditions. Sulkers’s is well-known as the godfather of alpine stewardship in the Whistler community—in a short walk in the backcountry you’ll get everything from an important history lesson on Whistler to and in-depth snowpack analysis, and everything in between.

 

Perhaps nobody has spent more time in the Spearhead Range than the venerable Mitch Sulkers, and it shows. His knowledge of the terrain is second to none, and if you’re going to take an AST Course, there’s no better person to do it with than one of the most well-respected mountain men in the Sea to Sky.

Daryl Treadway

AKA ‘Mid-Air’ little brother to Big-Air-Dan, and older brother to Little-Air-Dave. Following university in Lethbridge AB after a 5 year introduction to the mountains and ski industry, a mountain of student loans, and degrees in kinesiology and education, Daryl and his brother joined brother Dan in Whistler. Following Dan’s legendary tracks around the resort and snowmobile accessed backcountry; working with photographers and filmers, they pushed their skiing and mountaineering skills.

 

Daryl currently teaches at Pemberton Secondary, where he runs a Ski, Snowboard & Mt. Bik Academy.  Wife Pam and sons (Jonah-5 & Micah-7) play in the mountains on skis, sleds, dirt and mountain bikes, and occasionally by foot.  Passing on his knowledge and passion of adventure to his boys and students has replaced his selfish ambition; yet he still manages to get out with Pam and friends to play in the hills.

Tatum Monod

Tatum Monod was born in Banff, Alberta, to a family deeply entrenched in the sport of skiing. Her father, two uncles and aunt all raced on the Canadian National Ski Team, her parents met skiing and her grandfather was a Swiss mountain guide in Chamonix. In 1949, her grandfather opened one of North America’s longest running outdoor gear shops in Banff, called ‘Monod Sports.’ Although as a Tatum’s roots are in skiing she didn’t get her start until age twelve. Her parents never wanted to force her into skiing, ultimately learning to ski was Tatum’s decision and she believes that’s why she stuck with it.

 

Now 29 years old, Tatum has collected more accolades than most skiers do in a lifetime. She has racked up multiple award winning segments filming with Level 1 Productions, Matchstick Productions and The Sherpas Cinema. She has earned best female performance in 2017 at the Powder Awards. She has been highlighted in multiple magazines include the February 2018 issue of Powder Magazine featuring Tatum on the cover doing her signature laid out backflip. An avid fly-fisher, pie maker and recently hunter, Tatum lives to adventure. Without question, she is currently one of the best female backcountry skiers around.

RAVEN BACKCOUNTRY SUPPORTERS

PSAR (Pemberton Search & Rescue)

Pemberton and are is a winter wonderland with ample recreation opportunities for the outdoor sports enthusiast.  An almost unlimited number of backcountry activities creates unequaled conditions for a high incidence of backcountry emergencies. When someone goes missing or if a rescue must be conducted, members of Pemberton District Search & Rescue provide the technical and emergency medical skills required to reach, treat and remove injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

 

The Pemberton District Search & Rescue team is comprised of a diverse group of volunteers who invest countless hours away from family, friends and work to train for and provide critical life saving services to those in need. Our members are all trained in ground search and rescue techniques and emergency first aid.

MOTI (Ministry of Transportation & Infrastructure)

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure plans and improves transportation networks, builds new infrastructure, provides transportation services, and implements transportation policies, to allow for the safe and efficient movement of people and goods.

 

Heading out to the backcountry? Be sure to check the highway conditions before you go on Drive BC.