D'arcy BC Canada

Photo by Jorge Alvarez

D'Arcy is located at the head of Anderson Lake, about 42 km northeast of Pemberton. D'Arcy, also known as Nequatque or N'Quatqua in the St'at'imcets language (Lillooet) is a part recreation/residential area as well as the territory and residential area of the N'Quatqua First Nation.


D'Arcy was founded as a non-native community named Port Anderson during the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush of 1858. It became a major port of the Douglas Road which connected the upper Fraser Canyon from the lower Fraser by a series of portages and lakes. Transport steamers and other watercraft ran from Anderson Lake from D'Arcy to the foot of the lake at Seton Portage and then onto Seton Lake and then onto the boom town of Cayoosh Flats, which is today's town of Lillooet.

The name D'Arcy is from D'Arcy Tate who served as the V.P. and General Counsel of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway from 1912-1918. After the Gold Rush, the population was almost entirely First Nation and then at the time of the railway construction non-native settlers again came to the area and a general store and cabins were developed.

Anderson Lake

  • Anderson Lake offers a multitude of recreation activities. A public dock on the south end of the lake provides access to the water and has a swimming beach known as Heritage Beach. Offering sandy shores, picnic tables and beautiful views of Anderson Lake.
  • The Red Barn is an RV park only and the cafe is closed.
  • Anderson Lake Fish Hatchery and spawning channel on the N'Quatqua Reserve specializes in the release of sockeye salmon and enhancing Kokanee in Gates River into Anderson Lake. You can view this amazing spectacle between mid-August - mid-September

Highline Road

  • D'Arcy sits at the end of the paved Portage Road. There is a rough 4 x 4 gravel summer-only route called the Highline Road. This eventually leads to Seton Portage. You can also continue on to Lillooet by this route.

McGillivray Falls

  • Once on the Highline Road, at about the 12-kilometre mark you will arrive at the old train stop of McGillivray Falls. This is the site of a World War II relocation centre for Japanese-Canadians, the old McGillivray Falls Resort and the access point to the trail over McGillivray Pass which takes you to Bralorne & Gold Bridge.

Local Business & Services

  • The N'Quatqua First Nation operates most of the local businesses including a gas and convenience store and a community centre.